New Delhi: Taha Haaziq is blind, but his disability never stopped him from following his dreams. He teaches Indian classical music and even provides lessons on popular internet-based video-calling software Skype.

He also works with National Association for the Blind (NAB), Goan, as a computer trainer.

"I am blind but that doesn't stop me unless I stop myself," he said.

The lanky Goan was in the capital Tuesday to attend TechShare 2012, a platform to showcase the latest advancements in technologies that could provide greater self-dependence to the disabled.

However, he agreed that most of the 70 million Indians who suffer from disabilities, don't have such a positive outlook.

"Breaking the self created barriers is most important. I know a guy who is an MBA but despite all his qualifications, he is unemployed because he himself thinks that he is not fit to work, travel or lead a normal life," he told IANS.

Talking about how people often lose hope when faced with disability, he said that indulging in self pity does no good.

"The society has to accept the disabled as equals, but the disabled themselves have to realise that disability doesn't take away their right to a normal life," he said.

Agreeing with Haaziq, Shilpi Kumar, managing director of BarrierBreak Technologies, and organiser of the annual event, said: "The society often pities the disabled and the disabled often believe that they are to be pitied."

"Our motive behind TechShare is to create an ecosystem where the disabled can find their self dignity and realize that they too can live a normal, independent life," she said.

The event also had an 'Experience Zone' where corporates, innovators and entrepreneurs provided live demo of products such as talking clocks for blind, Braille keyboards and assistance systems for the disabled that could help them interact, navigate and even drive a car.

Reproduced from: TwoCircles.net

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